Welcome to My New Site!

 

 

I was spending some time with my nephew over the holidays and we got to discussing the various jobs (or what I call them – gigs) I have held over my career.

 

We discussed my time as a Photojournalist under a Pulitzer Prize-winning writer and editor. How I leveraged that knowledge in content creation to launch my own printing company before turning to the road and studio as a professional musician. We closed those tales with a discussion on my business education and how I leverage it in the entertainment industry. It was interesting to watch his face as I shared my various stories and experiences.

 

Sometimes I forget just how blessed I have been in my life. Sure, it has taken a LOT of hard work and perseverance. I have been down and out, bankrupt, and technically homeless at times, but I kept moving forward. I kept chasing my passions and my dreams no matter where they took me. Colebrook, NH… Nashville, TN… Orlando, FL… Las Vegas… Scottsdale, AZ… Hawaii… Aculpulco… Glacier Bay… and the Panama Canal to name a few spots.

 

I really wanted my young nephew to understand that the one thing we can’t get more of is time, so you really need to spend your life doing what you love.

 

That pushed me to finally organize my experiences on my personal website, which I present to you today. It has been a tedious task tracking down pieces from my graphic design portfolio, images from my time as a photojournalist, tunes from my various bands, and videos captured throughout my career. I have organized these assets into three categories.

 

Jeremy Larochelle Businessman – For a look at my experience as an entrepreneur. My college and grad school studies. As well as my theories on leadership, management, and marketing.

 

Jeremy Larochelle Musician – Is where I have placed my work as a touring and studio drummer and educator.

 

Jeremy Larochelle Content Creator – Here you will find my photojournalism, graphic design, and video creation portfolios as well as my experience in each area.

 

Finally, I have migrated my online drummer clothing company, Spirit and Groove® to this site.

 

I plan to continue updating all aspects of my web presence and even have some new offerings in the works, so please come back to see what I am up to.

 

~ Jeremy Larochelle, MBA

 

 

 

My Photojournalism and Graphic Design Portfolios Now Available

 

 

It took a lot of searching, but I found a bunch of my work as a photojournalist and graphic designer and organized them onto the site. I will continue to update them as I uncover new gems (and make some new ones).

 

Check out the portfolios at Jeremy Larochelle Content Creator.

I Moved the Groove

 

 

I decided to migrate my drummer clothing company website, Spirit and Groove®, to this site. I have kept the brand’s social media channels as-is and will continue to offer two lines of drummer t-shirts and drum hats under the GROOVE Stripes® and Groovy Fun lines with the anticipation to launch a Groove Powe® collection soon!

 

You can shop Spirit and Groove by CLICKING HERE!

KPI’s in Venue Management

I recently asked my LinkedIn network what KPI’s, besides revenue, they use for their entertainment venue analysis.

 

I figured this would be a tough question because I removed the most prevalent answer when it comes to venue management analysis – revenue generation. I wanted to omit the low-hanging fruit to force my network to consider other Key Performance Indicators regarding their entertainment space and how valuable they can be.

 

For those who do not understand what KPI’s are.  Here is a quick and simple breakdown from Investopedia. According to their site. “Key performance indicators (KPI) are a set of quantifiable measures that a company uses to gauge its performance over time. These metrics are used to determine a company’s progress in achieving its strategic and operational goals, and also to compare a company’s finances and performance against other businesses within its industry.”

 

The revenue metrics are the most important and fairly easy to digest in regards to entertainment booking. If you book a band and they sell out the venue. That is a positive KPI. Just remember, if you are in charge of assigning revenue metrics you should include ancillary income such as food and drink sales.  I have seen many situations where one act didn’t sell out the room but brought in a demographic that drank the house dry resulting in an overall larger return on investment.

 

Key Performance Indicators go beyond just revenue-generating metrics. Better institutions will assign them to other areas of the business eco-system such as cost reduction, process improvements, and customer satisfaction. All of these variables work off of one another and when assigned properly and analyzed consistently can lead to exponential growth.  Here are a few suggestions of non-revenue generating KPI’s to consider for an entertainment venue.

 

Cost Reduction: Is the venue overstaffed? Are your performance hours not in-line with your demographic (e.g. does the room die at 11:00 pm, but you are paying entertainment and employees to be on-site until 2:00 am)?

 

Process Improvement: Are you getting your guests in fast enough and moving them to areas of revenue such as the bar efficiently?

 

Customer Satisfaction: Are you monitoring the social chatter regarding your venue?  Are the reviews of your entertainment, venue, and operations positive? Are you surveying past customers to learn about their experiences to share with your team?

 

*BONUS – Employee Satisfaction: Are you talking to your team to see if THEY are happy? Do you survey guests regarding their experience with specific employees through analysis such as Net Promoter Scores and satisfaction surveys?

 

These are just a few suggestions regarding non-revenue KPI’s you can adapt for your entertainment venue. Just remember each business environment is different and you may have to tweak your analysis to uncover your areas of weakness and opportunity.  If you would like some help analyzing your entertainment venue, give me a shout.

 

 

Five Take-A-Ways from Five Years Booking and Managing Entertainment

I celebrate my five-year anniversary with Mike Moloney Entertainment on March 1st, 2018 and what a crazy, chaotic, and fun ride it has been. So, I wanted to share with you five take-a-ways from my time as a booking agent and entertainment manager.  Enjoy!

 

It’s Still About Opportunities to See

Gone are the days of malls, mom and pop stores, and various other brick and mortar outlets. They have been replaced by online merchants, specialty “long-tail sites like Etsy,” demand channels such as eBay, and social sales through Facebook, Pinterest, and Instagram among others.

 

When the distribution point of your product changes, it is imperative that your marketing strategies change with it. Why? New distribution points suggest you are dealing with consumers who have adopted new purchasing behaviors or, perhaps even more challenging. You need to re-train existing customers on these new digital protocols without losing their business. A great example lies in the fact that online buyers can’t physically touch the merchandise before they buy it. For some, who have grown up in the “online” world. This isn’t an issue. However, for department stores such as JCPenney’s and Macy’s with a funnel full of brick and mortar customers used to handling the merchandise. This is a problem that must be addressed.

 

The savvy marketers at Zappos quickly found the solution to this problem with their free returns and exchanges policies. Today, major retailers (including the aforementioned) have followed suit and now offer free returns. Some go so far as to streamline the process by providing return labels inside their packages and expedited reimbursement paths through the customer’s account section of their site. While John Q buyer still can’t touch the product before he makes his purchase, these policies reduce the perceived risk of their pre-purchase rituals and help close the gap between the brick and mortar and online worlds.

 

This is just the tip of the iceberg in regards to the changes the new “online” marketing landscape has forced on firms large and small. Customer reviews have become imperative for a company’s success as well as PCI compliant websites, PayPal payment channels, mobile-friendly landing pages, and social listening and engagement by the brand.

 

However, one core marketing element remains unchanged.

 

Opportunities to See still dominates the marketer’s playbook. Ultimately, the adperson’s primary goal still boils down to getting the brand name in front of as many relevant consumers as possible, so you can get them into the sales funnel where they will start the buying process.

 

I will argue that it is even more important now than ever.

 

In the past world of brick and mortar selling, competition was somewhat limited by physical location. E.g. you had to have a store or place for your customers to go to compete. Today,  many barriers to entry like this have been torn down like the Berlin Wall. It no longer matters where you are located or how much intellectual and financial capital you have. If you have the will and an internet connection. You can compete. Last year, popular online commerce platform Shopify announced the company supported over 375,000 merchants alone by the end of 2016.  That’s just one “out of the box” provider that caters to the “limited entrepreneur.” Add in other services such as Volusion, Magento, Bigcommerce, Wix, WordPress, and proprietary sites and it is very likely your business (no matter how niche it may be) is competing with a plethora of other brands across the web for the same customer’s attention. However, it get’s even more difficult. Since it takes the average online patron numerous views across multiple channels before they click “buy now.” Getting your message in front of those customers as many times as possible becomes a key ingredient to your success.

 

Yes, the distribution channel has changed and, yes, marketing strategies have changed with it. However, don’t let modern agencies scare you with new terms such as bounce rate, page views, click-through rate (CTR), cost per thousand (CPM). It all boils down to one basic fundamental that hasn’t changed in marketing strategy.

 

Opportunities to See.