Introducing Jeremy’s Drum Den

 

 

I am proud to announce my new YouTube playlist Jeremy’s Drum Den where I offer my insights on crafting studio-quality drum sounds in small spaces using electronic drums, digital audio workstations, and the latest drum software and plug-ins.

 

Follow me as I explore new drumming technologies and learn on-the-fly with the groove by my side.

 

 

Grab This FREE Drum Track

 

I just released this FREE drum track for all of you singers, songwriters, and producers who want to see the quality studio drum tracks I can provide for your next demo, album, or other musical projects. You can download Boot-Scootin’ Two-Step here.

 

 

 

Now Offering Custom Made Drum Tracks Online

 

 

After months streamlining the process, I am proud to offer custom made drum tracks for singers, producers, songwriters, and bands looking to enhance their demos, albums, and other recording projects.

 

 

My goal was to make this offering as seamless as possible.  It all starts on my Custom Drum Track Page here where you can learn more about my process, check out some samples, download a few free tracks to try, and place your order securely through my site using your credit card, PayPal, or Amazon Pay account. Each track is only $25.

 

Once the payment is processed, I will send you an email requesting your scratch track. Email me that file and I will drum to it on my Roland electronic kit, enhance the tracks using Logic and Steven Slate Drums, and then send you the groovy studio file all mixed down as well as the raw Midi version, so you can edit to your own liking.

 

I look forward to drumming with you!

~ Jeremy Larochelle

I Moved the Groove

 

 

I decided to migrate my drummer clothing company website, Spirit and Groove®, to this site. I have kept the brand’s social media channels as-is and will continue to offer two lines of drummer t-shirts and drum hats under the GROOVE Stripes® and Groovy Fun lines with the anticipation to launch a Groove Powe® collection soon!

 

You can shop Spirit and Groove by CLICKING HERE!

Underpromise….Overdeliver.

Forecasting a prospective market can be quite tough. Especially if you are a small business that lacks the resources to acquire and use costly third-party database results and analytical software. In some niche markets, data can be even harder to uncover even with these resources at your disposal.  For instance, I focus on the drum industry and even though there are a “crap ton of drummer’s out there” –words from an SEO consultant I worked with. It is tough to get empirical evidence on their behaviors. Luckily, I had developed my own forecasting model in grad school and was able to use that when working on my business plan for Spirit and Groove™.

My model follows a four-step process that creates a funnel from a 100% total market through a potential audience to the final stage of prospective buyers. The last step is a calculation I call the “gut metric” that allows me to adjust the data based on a “gut” feeling. Some would argue the use of this step, but I disagree for two reasons.

Number one, data is both qualitative and quantitative. Analytical software rarely includes the qualitative metrics. Algorithms are great, but there is a reason even Google and Facebook continue to seek out ways to model the “human” perspective. Number two, having run my own company, worked for firms of all sizes, and studied the business plans of countless publicly traded brands during my MBA studies, I have a refined understanding of what is actually possible when you have that empirical evidence in your hands and I am able to sift out marketing “pipe-dreams” from that data.

Perhaps the most important, my model aligns with the concept of “underpromise…overdeliver” – a theory I learned with one of the world’s top brands.

While working as a retail specialist and store mentor with Apple, I witnessed firsthand just how powerful this corporate mantra can be. Apple doesn’t simply include it in their employee manual and call it good. No, they drill it into the corporate-wide psyche. As a retail specialist, it is a concept you learn in your initial training before you are introduced to any of their coveted i-products. At Apple, you are taught to always tell the customer their iPhone would be fixed in 30 minutes, even if you are sure it will only take 10. This way, you are able to increase the consumer’s buy-in when you do deliver ahead of schedule, and that is just the tip of their underpromise…overdeliver iceberg.

If you follow the tech giant in the news, especially when earning’s statements come out. You will notice that (somehow) Job’s brainchild regularly outperforms their own corporate estimates. There is no doubt in my mind that part of this phenom lies in a brand-wide “underpromise/overdeliver” mentality.

Business owners and managers often “over-assume” their results will beat expectations. Managers see the glass as half full because their bonuses and growth-potential are directly related to those results. Owners usually adopt the same ideal, but for different reasons. They are emotionally attached to the brand, see things others may not have in their field of vision, and have much more on the line, which forces them to hope for better-than-expected results.

Neither of these are good ways to engage in business. Yes, overhyping serves a purpose in specific sections of the marketing mix. However, overhyping your forecasts with owners can be detrimental. Imagine what an investor would think if you told them you would hit 1,000,000 units sold in the first quarter of 2018, but you only hit half. Now imagine, that happens every quarter. Soon you will lose their confidence…then their support.  Now instead, flip the coin. You forecast that you plan to sell 500,000 units in the first quarter of 2018 and you end up selling just over 10% of those figures. To you, it may look like slight gains (maybe even losses, because through your rose colored glasses you were hoping for one-million). However, to that investor you now over-performed. If you continued this method for future quarters and witnessed similar results. Your investor’s confidence would grow exponentially and with that, your opportunity for explosive future growth would be solidified via their willingness to spend more on your ideas.

Remember, the underpromise/overdeliver concept is rooted in marketing and not finance. It is not designed to “cook the books” or to “sell a lemon.” Rather, it is a mantra that your entire team should adopt, so that it will become part of your overall corporate culture and brand. When properly instituted it impacts both sides of the ball. Your customers will constantly be “surprised” by your service while your investors will continue to experience a responsible and growing company worthy of continued investment.

 

 

24 Hours in the Life of an Entrepreneur

This is just one day…a Monday…of my life. I want people considering starting their own company to remember just how much time and effort it takes to make it happen, because one of their competitors could be a dude like me.

 

8am: Wake-up to an email from USPTO that a legal action has been placed against one of Spirit and Groove’s® trademarks and we have forty days to respond.

8:15am: As I shove oatmeal into my mouth, I investigate the claim and the party bringing it against my company. I find it legit, but winnable. However, it could be extremely costly to challenge. A HUGE decision must be made that will be 90% on faith, impacts my entire business plan, and could hinder my personal finances for the next few years.

9:00am: My regular job begins. Currently booking and contracting nine lounges for the next three months, two holiday weekends of parties for fourteen, managing the company social and website, and fielding inbound applicants.

1:00pm: Lunch-break and P90X workout…still fielding company emails.

2:00pm: Back at the daily grind.

3:30-3:45pm: Afternoon break, contact lawyers to represent Spirit and Groove® in the claim.

6:30pm: Filming Spirit and Groove’s® weekly Drummer Challenge. I record myself drumming, then green-screen intros.

7:00pm: Editing footage and preparing social for Wednesday’s launch of the video I just shot.

9:30pm: Work on Lesson 12 from Rosetta Stone® Spanish.

10:00pm: Open a company checking account and secure a company credit card after updating finances.

11:30pm: Begin investigating Angel Investors.

12:30am: Find a suitable business plan template and get to work.

2:00am: Bed.